‘Someday a woman will be president’ T-shirt was once banned from Walmart

Whether you were already working, in college or high school or toddling around your house in 1995, most people will probably agree that the mid-’90s wasn’t ancient Rome. You would never know that, though, based on this little excavated news gem: A cute cartoon T-shirt that said “Someday a woman will be president!” was banned by Walmart just 21 years ago because it was deemed “offensive” by the corporation and certain shoppers who you can only hope are sweating profusely as they watch the Democratic National Convention.

 

The T-shirts, which featured a takes-no-shit character from the comic Dennis the Menace named Margaret, were being sold at a Walmart in Miramar, Florida, when customers reportedly complained to the company that it was undermining every societal norm middle-aged Caucasian men had worked so hard to establish (OK, fine, those weren’t their exact words). But it’s not as if the statement made by Walmart spokesperson Jane Bockholt at the time was any better: “It was determined the T-shirt was offensive to some people, and so the decision was made to pull it from the sales floor.”

 

Offensive. After two-thirds of the 204 shirts the store had stocked sold in just two weeks, and Walmart was about to place an order for 100 more shirts. Clearly there were plenty of people in Miramar who disagreed that the message “goes against Walmart’s family values,” which was apparently the excuse the shirt’s designer was given by a Walmart buyer.

 

More: I’m ‘with’ Hillary Clinton, but I don’t want to be

 

At the time, a psychologist named Ann Moliver Ruben was in charge of marketing the T-shirts. When word spread that the store was shelving the feminist shirts, Ruben slammed Walmart: “Promoting females as leaders is still a very threatening concept in this country.” To its credit, Walmart reportedly admitted it hastily pulled the shirts after only a few complaints. After scores of protests (because you didn’t mess with ’90s women), the store ordered 30,000 more shirts that same year, and they sold like hotcakes. If Walmart feels like turning an insane profit ASAP and joining the rest of the country in 2016, it’ll do what Etsy did and find a way to offer these vintage T-shirts once again.

 

How sweetly ironic is it to think that the first possible female president is also the same woman who served on the board of directors for Walmart for six years and was the first woman to make partner at Rose Law Firm in Arkansas, where Walmart headquarters is based?

 

The first female president of the United States doesn’t need a T-shirt to prove she can get the job done – she just goes out and gets the job done, over and over again.

 

More: Hillary Clinton running for president is the best thing for my sons

 

Now, where can the rest of us score this T-shirt? It’s already sold out on Etsy, and we need something to wear on Clinton’s Inauguration Day. Come on, Walmart, let’s make this happen.

 

Before you go, check out our slideshow below:

 
hillary clinton quotes
Image: Wenn.com
Advertisements

An open letter to that white guy at the office

Dear white guy,

 

I get it. You grew up in a neighborhood where all the faces looked like your own. There may have been a few brown faces during your elementary and high school years. There were probably a handful more if you went to college. This isn’t your fault – I mean, you can’t help where you grow up. So you left this haven and went into the “real world.”

 

More: I’m a woman of color and the ‘sisterhood of women’ doesn’t include me

 

And that’s where the trouble came in. You’re encountering so many new people! Black guys, Jewish women! So you inevitably say some dumb ish that either elevates white people to god status or marginalizes people of color in such an abysmal way that we can’t believe a person actually said it out loud.

 

 

 
Eye roll gif
Image: Giphy
 

 

 

But don’t worry, white guy, we got you. We reached out to women and asked them to share the most out-of-pocket and offensive things that have been said to them – nearly all in a professional setting. So here’s a handy-dandy list of just a few things that you should definitely, absolutely never ask, say or do to a person of color, OK? (These happened. For real. I can’t make this ish up.)

 

More: Black people are asking for help, but white people aren’t answering us

 
 
    1. Ask a Jewish person if she has horns.
 
    1. Touch a black person’s hair. (Yes, even if you ask. Don’t ask. Why would you want to touch someone’s hair anyway? Weird.)
 
    1. See a person who looks to be of Asian descent drinking tea and make reference to it being a thing for “her people.”
 
    1. Use the N-word.
 
    1. Ask if you can use the N-word.
 
    1. Ask why it’s OK for us to use the N-word but not OK for you to use the N-word. (Note: Why do you want to say it so badly?)
 
    1. Stare when you see a woman wearing a hijab.
 
    1. Ask, “You’re from Japan? They speak Chinese there, right?”
 
    1. Ask someone wearing a hijab if she has to wear that.
 
    1. Tell a person of color that she “talks white.” (Sorry, it’s not a compliment.)
 
    1. Ask, “Do Chinese people, like, actually have dogs as pets? Or do they just eat them?”
 
    1. Ask, “If you’ve lived here so long, why do you still have an accent?”
 
    1. Tell someone they’re “pretty for a black/Mexican/insert ethnicity here” girl.
 
    1. Ask about my “baby daddy.”
 
    1. Remark with wonderment that a black person is “so articulate.”
 
    1. Tell someone from another country that it “must have been really hard adjusting to a First World education system.”
 
    1. Say, “I bet you’re good in bed.” (Honestly, don’t say this to anyone – it’s gross.)
 
    1. Ask, “Why are black women so angry?”
 
    1. Suggest that a woman of color not wear something because it “looks more sensual on her” than it does on her non-white co-workers.
 
    1. Tell someone, “You’re whiter than I am!”
 
    1. Refer to something “African” as being “jungle-y.”
 
    1. Refer to Africa as though it is a homogenous group of people as opposed to being a continent.
 
    1. Note, “I love Filipino women because they’re so beautiful and submissive, so unlike white women.”
 
    1. Ask, “But what are you really?”
 
    1. Say, “Wow, you don’t sound black on the phone at all!”
 
    1. Tell someone, “Mexicans don’t need restrooms, because they will just shit on the floor. But I was a good boss and provided them anyway.”
 
    1. Counter Black Lives Matter with All Lives Matter.
 
 

More: Cultural appropriation isn’t OK… not even when celebrities do it

 

Print it out, and put it on your desk. Make it your screensaver. Pin it. And not sure what other things you shouldn’t say to other people? This hashtag should help. You’re welcome.

 

Find out more on How to Be an Ally at the #BlogHer16 conferencethe premier event for women online, taking place from Aug. 4 – 6, 2016, in Los Angeles, California. Don’t wait! See the agenda and all the speakers, and get your ticket now.

Everything You Need to Know About Preparing for a Conference

Hey everyone, #BlogHer16 is NEXT MONTH from August 4-6 in Los Angeles! NEXT MONTH!

In our excitement, we’re dedicating July’s BlogHer University to getting yourself ready for #BlogHer16 (or really any professional content creation conference). We want to help you present your best self and get the most possible benefit out of your time, travel and commitment.

 
 

 

Everything you need to know about preparing for a conference

 

 
 

We’ll be talking to the BlogHer conference team, past BlogHer attendees and SheKnows Media staffers to get the most important scoop for you.

 
 
 
 
 

This Month’s Lessons

 
 
    • Who you need to see speak at #BlogHer16 (based on your goals, personal and professional)
 
    • Getting your imposter syndrome under control
 
    • Pro tips on staying organized so you can act on all your new conference connections when you get home
 
    • Dos and don’ts for talking to brands (at the Expo or anytime)
 
    • Social media mistakes you don’t want to make at an event
 
    • How to return to your blog after a long break (especially right before a conference)
 
    • How to make sure you’ve connected with everyone you want to before you leave
 
 
 
 

As usual, tune in to #BlogHerU on Twitter every Friday in July from 1-2 Eastern to join the conversation about the week’s lessons and add your own comments. See you there!

 
 
 
 

You can’t see the show if you don’t go to #BlogHer16. Register now for your seat in sunny Los Angeles August 4-6, 2016.

 
 

#BlogHer16: Experts Among Us is THE largest conference for women content creators in the world.

Don’t wait:

Register now: Space is limited.

 

Sign up for the #BlogHer16 newsletter for announcements and opportunities.

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

Rita Arens is the author of the young adult novel THE OBVIOUS GAME & the managing editor of BlogHer.com.

 

Emily Blunt and John Krasinski finally spill their baby news

The latest secretive celebrity parents are Emily Blunt and John Krasinski, who have managed to keep the birth of their second child within their closest circle for a whole two weeks.

 

More: Hands off Ellie Kemper’s baby bump, m’kay?

 

Krasinski broke their silence Monday, taking advantage of the July Fourth celebrations, to share the lovely news: Another little girl for the couple and a baby sister for Hazel, who was born in February 2014.

 
 
Emily Blunt baby

 
 

Emily Blunt baby

 
 
 

Violet is one of those old-fashioned baby girl names that has enjoyed a huge surge in popularity in recent years. As one of the prettiest color/flower names, it manages to be sweet yet strong. After high-profile parents, Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck chose it for their daughter in 2005, it began to rise in the baby name chart, and by 2015 it made it into the Top 50, for the very first time.

 

More: Bachelor couple pick a baby name to reflect their faith

 

Violet, a Latin name meaning “purple,” is a popular choice in children’s pop culture: Violet Baudelaire in Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, Violet Beauregarde in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Violet Parr in the animated film The Incredibles.

 

Earlier this year, 33-year-old Blunt revealed how different her second pregnancy was from her first, something all moms with kids close in age will relate to (or shudder at the memory of). “The first pregnancy is the most self-indulgent thing in the world because you get massages and prenatal yoga and hypnotherapy CDs,” she said. “During this one I forget that I’m even pregnant. I’m hoisting a 2-year-old around!”

 

Congratulations to the family of four!

 

More: This printable guide is about to solve all your baby-naming squabbles

 

Before you go, check out our slideshow below:

 
placenta
Image: MakiEni’s Photos/Getty Images